Getting Great Science to Market

Finding Cancer Therapies Without Cardiotoxicity

April 30, 2018

Lasting cardiac damage from cancer therapy can be devastating. Thanks to powerful new therapies, many people are surviving cancers that were once believed to be fatal. We are now seeing, however, that the off-target effects of these cancer therapies can have deadly repercussions, such as heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, thrombosis, heart attack, severe hypertension, Q-T…

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Navigating the Alphabet Soup of Agreements

March 22, 2018

As a busy PI conducting research, have you ever wondered why your institution asks you to complete certain agreements related to your research and what do they all mean. In a recent article in Nature Biotechnology, Dr. Colm Lawler, Senior Licensing Manager, from Partners Innovation and his co-authors from NYU and SUNY Upstate Medical, attempt…

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Industry Insights: Positioning Your Research to a Commercial Partner

March 22, 2018

Click here to watch the full length video. Much of the research conducted at our hospitals is applied to finding new treatments for some of the world’s most intractable diseases.  Collaborating with an industry partner on this research can be essential to keeping the research focused on a commercially viable path that leads to development…

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FIRST LOOK: Genetic Risk, Adherence to a Healthy Lifestyle, and Coronary Disease

March 22, 2018

Both genetic and lifestyle factors are key drivers of coronary artery disease, a complex disorder that is the leading cause of death worldwide. Long recognized to be heritable, genomewide association analyses have identified more than 50 independent variants robustly associated with risk of coronary disease. These risk alleles, when aggregated into a polygenic risk score,…

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Breaking the Code: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Potential of RNA

March 13, 2018

Ribonucleic acid, or RNA, is one of the three major biological macromolecules that are, along with DNA and proteins, essential for all known forms of life. Recently, types of RNA called microRNAs (miRNA) and long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been found to play important roles in gene regulation, capturing international scientific attention for their potential as…

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FIRST LOOK: Exercise Prescription to Improve Cardiovascular and Cancer Outcomes in Cancer Survivors

March 13, 2018

Exercise prescription upon completion of cancer therapies could improve fitness, as well as cardiovascular and cancer outcomes for select cancer survivors. Given the growing population of cancer survivors, exercise prescription has tremendous clinical and commercial potential. Advances in cancer care have achieved significant improvements in cancer survival, such that the population of cancer survivors in…

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Less is More: Minimalist Mitral Valve Repair

March 7, 2018

In the last decade, there has been a revolution in transcatheter therapies for structural heart disease. The most widely embraced, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), was originally intended for patients with aortic stenosis, in whom surgery was considered prohibitive, but it has now been utilized as an excellent alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement in…

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Navigating Healthcare IT: Winning Strategies to Commercialize Your HIT Invention

February 27, 2018

The opportunities and challenges of commercializing Healthcare Information Technology, or HIT, are different from those in licensing other patent-protected technologies. The third Symposium Series session, held on December 7th, took up that challenge and focused on the many activities Partners is engaged in to facilitate development of cutting edge HIT tools to support patient care.…

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FIRST LOOK: New Approaches to Controlling Stem Cell Fate

February 27, 2018

Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be propagated indefinitely in culture in an undifferentiated state or induced to differentiate into every cell type in the adult body, holds promise for regenerative medicine. Proper execution of these distinct but developmentally relevant programs requires precise tuning of gene expression by transcription factors. Indeed,…

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Quantitative Molecular Imaging for Cardiovascular Phenotypes

February 20, 2018

More than 17 million deaths worldwide were attributed to heart disease in 2016, and cardiovascular ailments persistently remain one of the biggest causes of hospital admissions in the United States. Cardiovascular disease also accounts for more healthcare costs than any other chronic illness, and is responsible for one out of every three deaths, on average.…

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FIRST LOOK: Using Zebrafish to Understand and Harness Cardiac Regeneration

February 14, 2018

The adult mammalian heart lacks any appreciable capacity to regenerate ischemia-damaged muscle. By comparison, injured zebrafish hearts mount an impressive regenerative response driven by robust myocardial proliferation. My laboratory’s research program is driven by the simple assumption that a complete understanding of cardiomyocyte proliferation regulatory mechanisms in zebrafish could be leveraged to promote heart regeneration…

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Targeting Inflammation in Cardiovascular Disease

February 14, 2018

Inflammation is the body’s natural way of protecting itself from harm. When fatty, cholesterol-rich plaque accumulates within the arterial walls, the immune system perceives it to be a foreign invader and sends white blood cells to attack, resulting in chronic low-grade arterial inflammation. It’s now believed that heart attacks and stroke are linked to this…

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Found in Translation: Academic Intellectual Property FAQ

February 6, 2018

For this post I want to build upon a great introduction to the world of patents that my colleague Nate Valverde, J.D. provided in his excellent article: Patent 101: Learn the importance of patents…and how to protect your invention.here Many academic researchers have specific questions as they seek to translate their basic science discoveries into…

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FIRST LOOK: Aging and the Activin Type II Receptor Pathway: A New Target for Heart Failure Therapy?

February 6, 2018

Heart failure (HF) represents a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Despite the strong association between advanced age and HF, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which the aging process predisposes older adults to HF remain unclear. To that end, our group is exploring biological systems that potentially link aging to HF pathophysiology…

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Expanding the Pool of Organs for Transplant

February 6, 2018

Heart transplantation does not adequately address the magnitude and severity of advanced heart failure (HF), a global public health concern that has the potential to reach epidemic proportions. While the gold standard for treating end-stage HF continues to be heart transplantation, there are simply not enough donor hearts available (about 2,000) for the more than…

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FIRST LOOK: Novel Target Discovery Pipeline for Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

January 30, 2018

Aortic stenosis due to calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most prevalent valvular disorder and is on the rise as the population ages. Left untreated CAVD has a dismal prognosis, inevitably leading to death. Annually, in the US alone, 80,000 patients progress to severe CAVD, requiring aortic valve intervention and at a cost of…

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FIRST LOOK: Stratifying Exercise Dysfunction

January 25, 2018

Exercise dysfunction is highly prevalent across the global spectrum of medical diseases, and is a principal cause of morbidity and increased healthcare cost burden. Abnormalities in multiple organ systems often underlie exercise dysfunction. However, current methods for analyzing exercise test results often rely on a narrow subset of variables involving a single organ system. This…

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Understanding Why Exercise Works for Just About Everything

January 25, 2018

Centuries ago, the Greek physician Hippocrates noted that when the body is “unused and left idle, it becomes liable to disease, defective in growth, and ages quickly.” These observations—made without the benefit of the exhaustive medical research and detailed studies that we have today—are just as valid now as they were then. Exercise is a…

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